Emotions

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a collection of wkipedia explanations

Emotions are biological states associated with the nervous system brought on by neurophysiological changes variously associated with thoughts, feelings, behavioural responses, and a degree of pleasure or displeasure.

There is currently no scientific consensus on a definition. Emotion is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, creativity, and motivation.

instinctive or intuitive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge.

Courage (also called bravery or valour) is the choice and willingness to confront agony, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation.

Physical courage is bravery in the face of physical pain, hardship, even death or threat of death, while moral courage is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal, discouragement, or personal loss.

The classical virtue of fortitude (andreia, fortitudo) is also translated “courage”, but includes the aspects of perseverance and patience.

Resentment (also called ranklement or bitterness) is a complex, multilayered emotion that has been described as a mixture of disappointment, disgust, anger, and fear.

Other psychologists consider it a mood or as a secondary emotion (including cognitive elements) that can be elicited in the face of insult and/or injury.

Inherent in resentment is a perception of unfairness (i.e. from trivial to very serious), and is a generalized defense against unfair situations (e.g. relationships or unfavourable circumstances)

Anger, also known as wrath or rage, is an intense emotional state involving a strong uncomfortable and hostile response to a perceived provocation, hurt or threat.

Disappointment is the feeling of dissatisfaction that follows the failure of expectations or hopes to manifest.

Similar to regret, it differs in that a person who feels regret focuses primarily on the personal choices that contributed to a poor outcome, while a person feeling disappointment focuses on the outcome itself.

It is a source of psychological stress. The study of disappointment is a focus in the field of decision analysis. as disappointment is, along with regret, one of two primary emotions involved in decision-making.

Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another person is experiencing from within their frame of reference, that is, the capacity to place oneself in another’s position.

Affective empathy, also called emotional empathy is the capacity to respond with an appropriate emotion to another’s mental states

Cognitive empathy is the capacity to understand another’s perspective or mental state

Somatic empathy is a physical reaction, probably based on mirror neuron responses, in the somatic nervous system.

Enthusiasm is intense enjoyment, interest, or approval. The word was originally used to refer to a person possessed by God, or someone who exhibited intense piety.

Interest is a feeling or emotion that causes attention to focus on an object, event, or process. In contemporary psychology of interest,[1] the term is used as a general concept that may encompass other more specific psychological terms, such as curiosity and to a much lesser degree surprise.

Passion (Greek πασχω “to suffer, to be acted on”[1] and Late Latin (chiefly Christian[2]) passio “passion; suffering” (from Latin pati “to suffer”; participle: passus)) is a feeling of intense enthusiasm towards or compelling desire for someone or something. Passion can range from eager interest in or admiration for an idea, proposal, or cause; to enthusiastic enjoyment of an interest or activity; to strong attraction, excitement, or emotion towards a person.

Angst a feeling of deep anxiety or dread, typically an unfocused one about the human condition or the state of the world in general.

frustration the feeling of being upset or annoyed as a result of being unable to change or achieve something.

In psychology, frustration is a common emotional response to opposition, related to anger, annoyance and disappointment. Frustration arises from the perceived resistance to the fulfillment of an individual’s will or goal and is likely to increase when a will or goal is denied or blocked.

There are two types of frustration: internal and external. Internal frustration may arise from challenges in fulfilling personal goals, desires, instinctual drives and needs, or dealing with perceived deficiencies, such as a lack of confidence or fear of social situations.

Conflict, such as when one has competing goals that interfere with one another, can also be an internal source of frustration or annoyance and can create cognitive dissonance.

External causes of frustration involve conditions outside an individual’s control, such as a physical roadblock, a difficult task, or the perception of wasting time.

There are multiple ways individuals cope with frustration such as passive–aggressive behavior, anger, or violence, although frustration may also propel positive processes via enhanced effort and strive.

This broad range of potential outcomes makes it difficult to identify the original cause(s) of frustration, as the responses may be indirect. However, a more direct and common response is a propensity towards aggression.

Confidence is a state of being certain either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective. Confidence comes from a latin word fidere’ which means “to trust”; therefore, having a self-confidence is having trust in one’s self. Arrogance or hubris in this comparison is having unmerited confidence – believing something or someone is capable or correct when they are not.

Self-esteem is an individual’s subjective evaluation of their own worth.

Distraction is the process of diverting the attention of an individual or group from a desired area of focus and thereby blocking or diminishing the reception of desired information. Distraction is caused by: the lack of ability to pay attention; lack of interest in the object of attention; or the great intensity, novelty or attractiveness of something other than the object of attention.

irritable: having or showing a tendency to be easily annoyed.

Loneliness is an unpleasant emotional response to perceived isolation.

Loneliness is also described as social pain—a psychological mechanism which motivates individuals to seek social connections.

It is often associated with an unwanted lack of connection and intimacy. Loneliness overlaps and yet is distinct from solitude.

Solitude is simply the state of being apart from others, not everyone who experiences solitude feels lonely.

As a subjective emotion, loneliness can be felt even when surrounded by other people; one who feels lonely, is lonely.

The causes of loneliness are varied. They include social, mental, emotional, and environmental factors.

Research has shown that loneliness is found throughout society, including among people in marriages along with other strong relationships, and those with successful careers.

Most people experience loneliness at some points in their lives, and some feel it very often. As a short term emotion, loneliness can be beneficial; it encourages the strengthening of relationships.

Chronic loneliness on the other hand is widely considered harmful, with numerous reviews and meta-studies concluding it is a significant risk factor for poor mental and physical health outcomes.

Confide: tell someone about a secret or private matter while trusting them not to repeat it to others. trust (someone) enough to tell them of a secret or private matter.

Emotional isolation is a state of isolation where one may have a well-functioning social network but still feels emotionally separated from others. Population-based research indicates that one in five middle-aged and elderly men (50–80 years) in Sweden are emotionally isolated (defined as having no one in whom one can confide). Of those who do have someone in whom they can confide, eight out of ten confide only in their partner. People who have no one in whom they can confide are less likely to feel alert and strong, calm, energetic and happy. Instead, they are more likely to feel depressed, sad, tired and worn out.[1][2][3] Many people suffering from this kind of isolation have strong social networks, but lack a significant bond with their friends. While they can build superficial friendships, they are often not able to confide in many people. People who are isolated emotionally usually feel lonely and unable to relate to others.

Psychosis an abnormal condition of the mind that results in difficulties determining what is real and what is not

Anxiety disorders are a group of mental disorders characterized by significant feelings of anxiety and fear.[2] Anxiety is a worry about future events, while fear is a reaction to current events

Love encompasses a range of strong and positive emotional and mental states, from the most sublime virtue or good habit, the deepest interpersonal affection and to the simplest pleasure.

An example of this range of meanings is that the love of a mother differs from the love of a spouse, which differs from the love of food. Most commonly, love refers to a feeling of strong attraction and emotional attachment.

“the unselfish, loyal, and benevolent concern for the good of another”

May 6, 2020